By
Ana Maria Lecea
President,
Professional Performance Development Group, INC.

For the last 40 years, millions of job seekers have been organizing their resumes the same way, starting with the job seekers’ goals, onto experience, etc. In doing this, they miss a golden opportunity to move up to the interview stage quickly. Why? Because employers are not interested in what your goals are, they want to know what you are willing to commit to the job and the organization. Employers want to know what you are willing to exchange for your wages. And the answer is that you are willing to exchange your time, energy, experience, and skills for your wages. Having said this, let’s look at what this resume should look like to get you not only in the door, but bring you to the short list. The following is the format, and I have listed questions that will help you to understand and write a far better resume.

My commitment to my employer:
(This speaks of your character)
What can the employer count on you to do, to what level, how often, and for how long?
How will you keep current with your knowledge to ensure that you increase your value to the employer?
You get the idea. It is all about what the “buyer” (employer) wants!

The knowledge, skills, and experience I will contribute to the organization:
(This speaks of your current qualifications to perform your work and the value you give it):
List and briefly describe each item.

Education, licenses, certificates, and awards:
(This speaks of your preparation to succeed in your field)
List each and describe how each one of them helped you to progress in your career.

Experience:
(This speaks of your journey and professional development and your marketable skills):
For each employer provide:
Name, location, date of employment, type of organization, position,
main job duties, and achievements.

Contribution:
Summarize what you bring to the position, your commitment, and why you want to work for the organization.
Make sure that you have done research on the company so you can identify values that you share with those of the organization, which will add creditability to your commitment.

References:
List people that you can trust and who have known you at work and outside of work.
One more thing – When contacted by a potential employer, get the address and send a hard copy
of your resume printed on high-quality paper in a folder. Lastly, always accompany your resume
with a cover letter that clearly states your interest and brief description of what sets your candidacy
apart from other candidates. Do this the same day.
Once you have your interview write a handwritten thank you note to each interviewer.